Immunisations are a quick, safe and effective way of protecting your child against a range of serious and potentially fatal diseases. The more children that have immunisations, the lower the chances of a disease outbreak.

The complete immunisation schedule can be found here.

Many parents are concerned that children have too many immunisations which weaken the immune system. Studies show that this is not the case (NHS Choices)

 

Your child will be offered the following immunisations:

 

Eight weeks–  Five-in-one vaccine (diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Hib (Haemophilus influenza type b); Pneumococcal Vaccine (protects against Pneumococcal infections) Rotavirus (a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness) and Men B (Meningitis B).

12 weeks–  Five-in-one vaccine (diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Hib (Haemophilus influenza type b), and Rotavirus (a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness).

16 weeks– Five-in-one vaccine (diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Hib (Haemophilus influenza type b), Pneumococcal  Vaccine (protects against pneumococcal infections) and Men B (Meningitis B).

12-13 months– Hib/ Men C booster, MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella), Men B (Meningitis B) and Pneumococcal vaccine.

Two, three and four years– Annual Flu Vaccine will be offered from Autumn 2014 to children aged two, three and four on September 1st 2014, it is given as a nasal spray.

Pre-school booster – Given from the age of 3 years 4 months, to starting school, includes MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) and four-in-one (diptheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio)

BCG (TB vaccine) is not given routinely, it is offered to a baby who is thought to have an increased risk of coming into contact with TB.

 

Useful information

Protecting your baby against meningitis and septicaemia

Using paracetamol to prevent and treat fever after MenB vaccination

Vaccination schedule age checklist